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Start As You Wish To Continue

Moving country is not for the faint-hearted.  No doubt, you have taken a risk, a calculated risk. But you have still jumped without a very clear picture of what you are doing. 

Maybe you do have a clear picture?  Or is that a very stereotypical viewpoint? Is it made of a fair few assumptions based on what you have read online?

Around 95% of the people who we have moved have not been to Australia before.  If they have been here, it was as a tourist and they enjoyed the sights of the cities.  None have explored suburbs.  Who would? let’s be honest.  Australia is huge and I am probably not too far off the mark by saying you might not even realise how big it is.

People move to Australia for fresh air, low crime, job opportunities and many, many other reasons. Our major cities are voted as the most liveable in the world. This makes a fairly easy assumption that you are moving for a better life.

Why then do want to continue as you were before?

If you keep doing what you doing, you will keep getting what you get.

Don’t get me wrong, there are times when your fellow countrymen in Australia can be a great asset to the success of your move, but you need to recognise, they can also be your downfall. 

Let’s discuss this further in three parts:

  1. Migrant Silos
  2. Suburb choices
  3. Networking

Migrant Silos

In the words of motivational speaker Jim Rohn:

You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.

The people you spend the most time with shape who you are. They determine what conversations dominate your attention. They affect which attitudes and behaviours you are regularly exposed to. Eventually, you start to think as they think and behave as they behave.  Worst still,you accept what they are willing to accept.

When you arrive in Australia, if you only ask for advice from your countrymen, you will most likely be setting yourself up for accepting what they accept, not what the average Australian might accept.

Let me give you an example. I met someone from the Philippines.  We were chatting about interviews in Australia.  I asked him what salary he would be looking for, what was he worth?  He replied.  “I would be happy with around $50.000 it is enough for me and I can send some home.” 

Whilst that might be a huge rise in his wages from the Philippines, it is not what the average Australian would be asking for.  If you arrive at an interview, underselling yourself, the corporate will think you are only worth that rather and they will not value your contribution to a company. 

My point here is that your new local friends should be your friends, but when it comes to work, then find people in your profession.  Seek out like-minded people on Linkedin and get a more local perspective on your worth. 

Finding a suburb

This same line of thought leads me to who you might turn to when trying to find a suburb. Your fellow countrymen who have been here a year, even two years are still very new and don’t really understand the suburbs yet – even their own or neighbouring suburbs.  However, they will be quick to recommend where they live.

Why? well, the answer is twofold. 

First, you will hear them say “Oh anything is better than back home!” Secondly, they don’t know all the schools or the history of the area.

I was chatting to a new arrival just yesterday who said someone had recommended: “Lalor and Mill Park, what did I think?”  Pick me up from the floor!  These areas just outside Melbourne are known for their motorbike gangs.  Local Australians would know this and for the average, they might not choose to live there for that reason.  

I bring you back to the quote above, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” 

Just because an area is better than where you have moved from, does not make it the right choice for you and your families future. 

If you have moved to Australia for a better life, why start at the same point as to where you left? Start where you mean to continue from.

Sure, it can be difficult to network with locals about suburbs in the few weeks you have to find a home, but you can book a consultation with me to give you some guidance by taking a holistic view of your family, your needs and your budget.

Networking is key!

If you are an electrical engineer, would you ask a lawyer what you should earn? Some might say, “yes, of course, they are smart!”.  Yes, they are, I am not going to disagree, but, do they possess the smart sense where you need it?  

If you have a contact with a lawyer who is a countryman you respect, then rather than ask them what the average wage of an electrical engineer is, ask him/her if they know someone in your line of work and every person you speak to, ask them if they know someone.  

Rather than ask on social media if someone can tell you, ask “Are there any electrical engineers on this forum that I can chat to?” In Australia, LinkedIn is used very widely, it is the modern cold calling.

LinkedIn Tips

If you want to attract the right attention, make sure your profile is up to date with a professional photo.  Please, no cat ears on your photo or the biggest fish you ever caught.  Keep it professional. Do not spam people, Be genuine and get to the point. Be grateful to people –  I know it should not need to be said, but sadly some people do take advantage.

Best of luck with your endeavours.  Be prepared to invest in yourself so you can compete with locals for homes and work.  If you found this useful, please share it with someone else on the same journey as you.

If you are looking for a one-stop-shop to manage your relocation, we at Personnel Relocations can help you. We understand that every relocation is different and each one has different goals. 

To contribute to your settling in Australia, we have alliances with experts such as relocation mentors, life coaches, cross-culture trainers, baby equipment hire, business communication specialists, local and international furniture removals, interior designers, decluttering, unpacking and setting up trades services who can help with specific needs.

It is not unusual for Personnel Relocations to handle the full suite of relocation needs, all from just one call.

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